"In 2003, Pep Bonet visited Nchelenge in northern Zambia, and found that one person in four was HIV positive. The atmosphere was tight and suspicious. No one wanted to admit to their HIV status and women who were HIV positive were often beaten or abandoned.  When Bonet returned in June 2005, he discovered a community largely transformed. People had rediscovered hope. This was partly due to the extraordinary strength and courage of a few individuals who, despite the stigma, had spoken openly about their status. Men and women who were HIV positive were working alongside hospital staff, administering medical care and psychosocial counseling, and distributing ARVs. That month, the Zambian government announced free antiretroviral drugs would be made available nationwide."     © Pep Bonet

"In 2003, Pep Bonet visited Nchelenge in northern Zambia, and found that one person in four was HIV positive. The atmosphere was tight and suspicious. No one wanted to admit to their HIV status and women who were HIV positive were often beaten or abandoned. When Bonet returned in June 2005, he discovered a community largely transformed. People had rediscovered hope. This was partly due to the extraordinary strength and courage of a few individuals who, despite the stigma, had spoken openly about their status. Men and women who were HIV positive were working alongside hospital staff, administering medical care and psychosocial counseling, and distributing ARVs. That month, the Zambian government announced free antiretroviral drugs would be made available nationwide." © Pep Bonet


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